• All the participants in the Murphy town logo design contest were honored Thursday morning at Town Hall.
    All the participants in the Murphy town logo design contest were honored Thursday morning at Town Hall.
  • Justin Mack (middle) won $100 for designing Murphy's new logo. He got his check from Murphy Council members Gail Stansell (left) and Karen Watson.
    Justin Mack (middle) won $100 for designing Murphy's new logo. He got his check from Murphy Council members Gail Stansell (left) and Karen Watson.
  • N.C. Rep. Kevin Corbin (right) and Murphy Councilwoman Gail Stansell talk with young artists who submitted designs for Murphy's logo contest on Thursday morning.
    N.C. Rep. Kevin Corbin (right) and Murphy Councilwoman Gail Stansell talk with young artists who submitted designs for Murphy's logo contest on Thursday morning.
  • Justin Mack's winning design for the new Murphy logo.
    Justin Mack's winning design for the new Murphy logo.
  • Emily Palmer received her certificate from Murphy Councilwoman Karen Watson for participating in the town's logo design contest on Thursday morning at Town Hall.
    Emily Palmer received her certificate from Murphy Councilwoman Karen Watson for participating in the town's logo design contest on Thursday morning at Town Hall.

Murphy picks new logo, honors participants

    Murphy – Justin Mack will have many chances to smile when he sees town vehicles drive by in the future.
    Mack was the winner of Murphy’s logo design contest, earning himself $100 and artistic immortality at Monday’s town meeting.
    The winning entry – No. 2 for anyone who voted on the six finalists – came from 572 votes from the public, ending at Saturday’s Spring Festival. There were 42 entries.
    On Thursday morning, the town honored all the participants in the logo design contest with framed certificates that included their submission. U.S. Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) joined Mayor Rick Ramsey in congratulating the group, many of whom were schoolchildren, on their creativity and civic pride.
    “There was a lot of pride shown in this contest, and it says a lot about this community,” Meadows said. “You don’t get any more North Carolina than Cherokee County and Murphy.”
    Before heading off to a busy day of events, Meadows mentioned to the established crowd that President Donald Trump recently told him how grateful he was for the strong support he had in Cherokee County.
    N.C. Rep. Kevin Corbin (R-Franklin) also addressed the young artists and asked them to show him their submissions. He missed the beginning of the traveling party of officials following Meadows through town to tell them what a fine job they did and to encourage participation in their community.
    Art teacher Brooke Muzik of Hiwassee Dam and Ranger schools encouraged many of the students honored for their participation and was proud of their hard work.
    In other town business Monday night:
    * A block of four parcels of property had their designations changed from residential to commercial by 5-0 vote, with Councilman Noland Smith recused. Smith owns part of the properties, which run from Petrie Street down to U.S. 74.
    Councilman Frank Dickey said the properties are no longer useful for residential, and the change is a move to support further business growth.
    William McKeever and Bill Forsyth are among the other property owners of the parcels in question. Dickey said there were no immediate property tax implications for the status change.
    * David Vowell secured $4,500 for the next fiscal year for the Cherokee County Arts Council by a unanimous vote of the council.
    * The board held a public hearing on the possibility of making future town elections non-partisan. Citizens Melody Johnson and Linda Ray both praised the idea.
    “The only ‘negative’ is that people are going to have to tell us what their actual platform is,” Johnson said.
    A block of 10 percent of the eligible voters in Murphy would have to present a petition before the June 4 meeting to put a referendum on the November ballot. Otherwise, the council could decide on its own to amend the charter.
    * At that same June 4 meeting, there will be a public hearing on the 2018-19 fiscal year town budget beginning at 5 p.m.