• Nancy Allen offers up spaghetti plates during Appalachian Angels’ Spaghetti Dinner Sept. 29.
    Nancy Allen offers up spaghetti plates during Appalachian Angels’ Spaghetti Dinner Sept. 29.

Appalachian Angels raise $7,000

    Murphy – The Appalachian Angels’ Spaghetti Dinner fed 207 people and raised $7,386 dollars on Sept. 29 at the Penland Senior Center in downtown Murphy.
    The main fundraiser for the all volunteer organization featured 19 volunteers cooking, plating, cleaning, and ticket taking this year. David Lance, chairman of the Appalachian Angels Board of Directors, was “incredibly surprised by the outpouring of support from the local business community and restaurants who donated items for the silent auction.”
    Connie Lance, a board member for the organization, was equally impressed “from the community, the public coming out, the support was amazing, we had more than we anticipated, more than we dreamt of. We are very surprised, very pleased, and very happy.”
    Mr. Lance explained that over the last year, Appalachian Angels “sent kids to karate classes, bought them baseball bats and eye glasses. This summer we sent 6 children to the YMCA summer camp out in Bryson City, Camp Watia.”
    Larry Ackerman explained, “My wife is involved with Appalachian Angels, so I reckoned I better come” and support her. He realizes that the children in foster care “need guidance and Appalachian Angels helps to provide that.”
    At home, Bill Cantrell does all the cooking, so the spaghetti dinner “is a good opportunity to get out and enjoy not cooking.”
    “I’m the dishwasher,” chimed in Phyllis Cantrell, his wife, “so I don’t mind either.”
    Pat Seal and her husband Les came out to the dinner as well. Pat just likes to help people. “We saw it in your paper and decided to come and support this good cause.”
    Les believes that “This is something that’s surely needed. I think the volunteers are under appreciated and we just wanted to give back.”
    Martin Sachs, whose melodious voice opened the John C. Campbell Folk School’s annual Fall Festival on Saturday, sees helping Appalachian Angels as “a community thing” that he was proud to support because “they provide a boost for special kids.”